How To: Pack For Your First Year at University

Packing for University can be an overwhelming task, especially when moving to another state or country. After all, how are you meant to pack your whole life into a few measly boxes? The answer is simple— you shouldn’t.

Here at Liveable, we’ve come up with a handy little checklist for you to tick off as you go. Aside from some decorative items that should be packed along to ensure that your new dorm would feel more like home, we’ve narrowed down the absolute essentials that you would need in order to leave for University with a peace of mind.

How To: Pack for your First Year at University

How To: Pack For Your First Year at University

Best Suburbs for Students in Sydney

Best Suburbs for Students in Sydney

With the new semester just around the corner, it is not uncommon for students to start looking for a change of scenery in terms of their accomodation.

After all, it can get frustrating having to share living facilities, such as the bathrooms and kitchen, between a whole floor of students. As such, many students often bid goodbye to their student accomodation and in turn, look towards renting off-campus accomodation either individually or with a group of friends.

With the help of results generated from Liveable, we’ve narrowed down the most popular suburbs amongst students that are both close to their chosen university, and have a buzzing student community that resides in the area.

University of Sydney (USYD)

 

  • Newtown

    Newtown is a favourite amongst Usyd students, not only because its conveniently located just 10 minutes away from the university, but also due to the vast number of pubs, bars and restaurants in the area.

    The University of Sydney has also recognised the convenience of this location and hence, has established one of their biggest student accomodations, Sydney University Village, in this friendly suburb.

    Furthermore, Newtown is vibrant and pulsing with life— with the Enmore Theatre, a popular music venue often drawing large crowds on the weekends.

    It costs $288/week for shared housing or $500/week to live in a 1 bedroom apartment.

  • Enmore

    This inner-west Suburb is another popular area that students choose to reside in. Despite being a little bit further away from the University of Sydney compared to Newtown (18 minutes via public transport), its appeal lies in its contemporary grunge vibe.

    Furthermore, Enmore is home to many up and coming foodie hotspots and has a ton of hidden gems that are tucked away, just waiting to be found.

    Similarly, it costs $288/week for shared housing or $500/week to live in a 1 bedroom apartment in this suburb.

University of New South Wales (UNSW)

 

  • Randwick

    Randwick is often the suburb of choice for UNSW students because of the fact that it only takes a mere 9-minute bus ride to get you from lectures to the comfort of your home.

    Due to this fact alone, there is a thriving student community in the area. This is complemented by lots of cheap eats (Randwick is particularly well known for its asian cuisine) and supermarkets— making it extremely convenient for students to adapt to living alone.

    Living in Randwick would set you back $334/week for shared housing or $510/week for a 1 bedroom apartment.

  • Kingsford

    If you’re after a slightly more affordable option, Kingsford may be the suburb for you. With an average rent of $275/week for shared housing or $430/week for a 1 bedroom apartment, many UNSW students also choose to call Kingsford home.

    Because of the large student population, it is not uncommon to chance upon restaurants and pubs with great student discounts. It also doesn’t hurt that this suburb is just a short 13 minute journey from the University.

University of Technology Sydney (UTS)

 

  • Ultimo

    Interestingly, the price of shared housing in Ultimo is comparative to a 1 bedroom apartment, with the former costing $390/week and the latter costing $380/week— not too steep of a price considering you’re a quick 6 minutes from UTS, and also incredibly close to Broadway shopping centre.

    With that said, it may be of interest to note that this suburb is known for having a relatively high crime rate, hence, students should be a little wary should they choose to walk home from late night study sessions or a night out.

  • Chippendale

    Chippendale was predicted to be Sydney’s next “it” suburb by Vogue Australia in 2015 and it has well and truly lived up to this reputation. In recent years, Chippendale has managed to redefine itself as one of the prominent art precincts, with regular gallery walks taking place in the area (eg. BEAMS Art Festival).

    It is a 6 minute journey to UTS and would cost an average of $338/week for shared housing or $510/week for a 1 bedroom apartment.

Macquarie University

 

  • Marsfield

    Marsfield is a great location for students who don’t enjoy the hustle and bustle of city living, but still crave the convenience of having a variety of shops and restaurants at their doorstep.

    This suburb is just a 4 minute drive to Macquarie Centre and a 13 minute bus ride to Macquarie University; needless to say, this is why Marsfield has such a concentrated population of students living in the area.

    Rent here would set you back $229/ week for shared housing, or $368/ week for a one bedroom apartment.

  • Pennant Hills

    Despite being 28 minutes away from Macquarie University, the commute would be well worth it for students who enjoy living amongst nature.

    After all, this safe and peaceful suburb is nestled within two large national parks. With a ton of walking trails to choose from, as well as a huge number of sporting facilities, your weekends will never fail to be dull in this Northern suburb.

    Rent in this area is an average of $217/ week for shared housing, and $385/ week for a one bedroom apartment.

Best Suburbs for Students in Sydney

How To: Survive Student Orientation Week

Survive Student Orientation Week

Whether its deciding between staying out late for a student mixer or making it to your 8am lecture the next morning, or deciding if throwing your pink shirt into the washer with your whites is a good idea (it isn’t), navigating your first week at University during orientation week may seem like a little bit of a minefield.

With a multitude of events going on left, right and centre, its important to prioritise whats important to you so as to ensure that you don’t burn out.

Here are our best tips to ensure that you come out of Orientation Week in one piece:

Get involved at orientation

Of course its intimidating to start university not knowing a single soul, but spending the whole day holed up in your room isn’t going to make matters any better. Take a deep breath, go forth and socialise— show up to events with a smile and take initiative to introduce yourself to others. Although you may feel awkward, remember that all of you are in the same unfamiliar boat and more likely than not, others would appreciate your efforts to break the ice!

Socialising may not be your strongest suit but seemingly small actions, like making the effort to remember the names of the people you meet, can go a long way. A handy tip to remembering names is to casually use the person’s name throughout the conversation; for example, “Good to meet you, Sam“, or “What’s your timetable looking like, Sam?”

Don’t sign up for the first society you see

On the flip side, don’t get ahead of yourself and sign up for every single society that hollers at you. Yes, societies are a great way to meet people outside of your course, and they’ll look great on your CV, but think, are you REALLY keen on joining the crocheting society? Or are you signing up for the sake of it? Furthermore, many societies ask for an upfront registration fee— so unless you’re 100% sure that you’ll stick to it, perhaps have a look around to see what other societies interest you more before making a final decision.

Ration the events you choose to go for

We all know the saying, “go hard or go home“, but partying 24 hours a day, 7 days a week will more likely send you to the hospital. Missing one or two events may give you some serious FOMO, but don’t fret, the world will keep turning.

Taking some nights off will not only allow you to nurse your hangover from the night before and ensure that you are feeling 100%, but it will also allow you to get to know the people living in your vicinity better. Rather than attempting to get to know people via broken conversations over blaring music and overpriced drinks, a cosy night in playing card games or watching feel-good movies with your flatmates may pleasantly surprise you.

Customise your timetable (the earlier the better)

With so many activities going on in your first week of university, customising your timetable will probably be the last thing on your mind. However, take 15 minutes out of your busy schedule to pick and choose exactly which tutorial slots work best for you. This will allow you to best align your semester with your study habits.

For example, some students thrive when they are able to squeeze in some extra hours of sleep in the morning, hence, tutorials after lunch may work well for them. On the other hand, if you prefer to get your lessons over and done with, opt to start you days with back-to-back tutorials early in the morning.

Get crackin’ on the student discounts

From discounts on meals to university events and parties, student discounts are basically a god-sent when you are attempting to survive University on a student budget. With that said, student union cards often require you to pay a rather substantial annual membership fee, however, signing up will often be worth it in the long run.

Other sites like Unidays also offer heaps of discounts (sometimes at 40% off) to students, with no registration fee required at all.

 

Once you’ve navigated orientation week successfully, Liveable can help you find your ideal place to live that’s within your budget and close to campus.

How To: Survive Student Orientation Week